Research

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Research

UCL Institute of Education

Limpsfield Grange has been working together with the UCL Institute of Education to evaluate new approaches to teaching reading for young people with autism. Horatio Turner delivered a reading intervention to a small group of students over a period 6 weeks. This intervention helped the students to learn strategies they can use to improve their reading comprehension.

The students who participated in the intervention showed a substantial improvement in their reading comprehension, with an average improvement of 4 years and 1 month over the 6-week period. Furthermore, students also showed improvements in their knowledge of vocabulary and their confidence at reading and discussing a text with their peers. This confidence was reflected in some of the comments of students who described it as…

“This group has really helped with my speaking and listening skills”
December 2015
“If I’m finding something really difficult, I can use the strategies we learned”
December 2015
“I liked how I got loads of ideas out and I got what the story was about”
December 2015

Emily Dillon

Emily Dillon, Trinity College Dublin, researched girls with Autism and the social use of language.  The aim is to eventually create a gender specific diagnostic criteria based on the gender specifics observed so that girls with Autism can be recognised.

For the results of the research click here

“Limpsfield Grange has been the kind host to a research project from Trinity College Dublin investigating gender differences in autism spectrum disorder. The study focuses on social language traits as a subtle index for distinguishing how girls with autism are unique from their male peers. The students and mothers who participated were interviewed about their lives, and completed several problem solving and storytelling tasks. The study will gather participants from across the UK, Ireland and United States to offer a more complete, international view of the unique nature of female autism. We hope the project serves as a first step in directing more appropriate supports and diagnostic criteria of autism for both genders.

Many, many thinks to the students, staff, teachers and community of Limpsfield Grange for all their support and huge role in this research!”

Emily Dillon